What to do if I need financial aid from my college but my parents refuse to fill out the FAFSA?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if I need financial aid from my college but my parents refuse to fill out the FAFSA?

Nothing will change their mind. I need to know what I can do legally to get around this? I am still under their health care and they still pay for my phone bill but they do not contribute in anyway to my college education. I am 19 years old in need to have them fill out the fafsa for me until I am 24 but they will not no this. I am unable to pay 60,00 out of pocket own my own for college and I cannot sit around and wait until I am 24 to get independent financial status. What can I do?

Asked on December 4, 2012 under Family Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I am so sorry about this but unfortunately your options may be other than what you would like. The Higher Education Act of 1965 allows a student whose parents refuse to complete the FAFSA and who have terminated all financial support to obtain unsubsidized Stafford loans of $5,500 to $7,500 a year, depending on the year in school. If your parents do not change their minds about completing the FAFSA and helping you pay for college, there are only two practical options. One is to enroll at a low cost community college. You might be able to obtain a part-time job to pay for the college costs. The other is to wait until you turn age 24 to go to college, when you will automatically be considered independent. There is nothing wrong with getting your college diploma from a state school or less expensive college, doing really well and then apply to Graduate School on a merit and/or need basis.  There can be great satisfaction in paying for it all yourself.  Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption