If I lied to my landlord about getting laid off when I didn’t, what action can he take against me?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I lied to my landlord about getting laid off when I didn’t, what action can he take against me?

I wanted to get out of my lease early so I lied that I got laid off when I didn’t so he would let me use my deposit as rent. He called my employer to verify my employment and now he says he can press criminal charges against me for fraud. Ironically I am leaving my job and Monday is my last day. Is this true? I know he can sue for rent but criminal charges?

Asked on September 24, 2011 under Real Estate Law, New Hampshire

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you misled your landlord into releasing you from your lease and you intended to do so which seems to be the case based upon what you have written and your landlord has been damaged, he or she can make a criminal complaint against you.

Based upon what you have stated, most likely the dirstict attorney's office will not be interested in pursuing a criminal charge as to you in that what you have described sound more like a civil action is in order against you for civil fraud.

Your landlord's damages would be the amount of the monthly lease that you would not be paying exceeding what the new tenant would be paying assuming that the new tenant would be paying less for the duration of the balance of your lease's term.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption