If I had sex with a girl on my high school senior trip and another girl heard about it and told her mom who called our school’s office, what kind of trouble can I get in?

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If I had sex with a girl on my high school senior trip and another girl heard about it and told her mom who called our school’s office, what kind of trouble can I get in?

I was on my high school senior trip to Washington DC and I had sex with a girl from my school in my hotel room. The rumor was spread until the whole class found out because she told her friend about it. One girl called her mom and told her what happened. Her mom called my high school office and told them what happened. We are both 18 and we signed papers saying that we would follow school rules on the senior trip. I have denied having sex with her and claimed it was a rumor. What kind of trouble can I possibly be in considering I did not admit to it and all evidence is in the form of a rumor? Also, can I take this to court if I am punished? I’m headed to college next year and can have my admittance revoked if I recieve discipline at my school.

Asked on March 23, 2019 under Personal Injury, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Your school is not bound by the rules of evidence or standards of proof that apply in court: if the school decides that the "evidence"--what other people say about what happened--is credible or believable, the school can discipline you for it.
If you suffer a consequences, you could try to sue school for violating your right to education--in court, the rules of evidence, etc. apply, so there would have to be evidence. And/or you could try to sue the person(s) who spread the rumor for defamation. But if there are tapes of her entering and leaving your room, or she sent texts or social media posts referencing this, or if the girl herself, when subpoenaed and testifying under oath (and so subject to punishment if she lies) tells the truth about what happened, your lawsuit(s) will lose. 
 


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