I got in a car accident a week ago, I did not get a police report or exchange insurance information with the other driver. We had a verbal agreement

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I got in a car accident a week ago, I did not get a police report or exchange insurance information with the other driver. We had a verbal agreement

that she would pay out of her pocket. How long after the car accident can I file a police report

Asked on April 15, 2009 under Accident Law, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 13 years ago | Contributor

If you were "nice" enough to allow the other driver to pay for the damages out of her own pocket and the other driver did not immediately honor the verbal agreement to pay to fix the car , what are you waiting for? For her to sue you?

Regardless of the time you're required to report an accident to the police or DMV or both under your state's law -- I'm not a Colorado lawyer so I can't say -- even if you did not file on time it's always better to report and file a little late than a lot late.

In any accident situation you are usually wise reporting it to your insurance company right away, both as your policy requires you to report to your carrier right away and it is amazing how many times people can change their story when they realize the financial consequences of what they thought was the right thing to say at the accident scene. When you report it to your carrier it will quickly and inexpensively investigate and get the facts locked down, which prevents the other person from easily changing her story to paint you as the responsible party.

If you have collision insurance, that's often the way to go, especially when the other driver or her carrier stalls or starts to nickel and dime you.


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