What are my right if I want to sue my landlord because he has violated my privacy multiple times?

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What are my right if I want to sue my landlord because he has violated my privacy multiple times?

Most recently he spoke with my son’s ex-wife’s attorney about my rental history; if I was behind and how far behind. Since my son now lives with me, they were questioning the landlord. Due to the fact that I’m a bit behind, they have refused to let my son’s child come visit on his visitation weekends and this has caused me, a 71 year old widow, many headaches and much grief. Also, about 3 months back my landlord let himself into my apartment while I was in the restroom. I was unable to get to the door in time and when I came out he had just opened the door and walked in my apartment. He is the owner of the small complex.

Asked on June 11, 2015 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

There actually is no law or legal right requiring a landlord to keep his/her tenant's rental history secret or confidential, so the landlord can disclose this information; and he is not liable or responsible for what other people (e.g. your son's ex-wife) does with the information after that. You do not appear to have a claim or cause of action for this.

It is wrong for the landlord to let himself into your unit unless he'd provided prior notice (24 hours or more) of maintenance, inspection, repairs, or a showing to possible new buyer or renter, or unless there was a seeming emergency (e.g. a leak) to be dealt with the. However, as a practical matter, if he did it once and not on a recurring basis, you would not receive any compensation for it in court--courts will not provide monetary compensation for one-time invasions like that.


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