What to do if I am a new employee and noticed union dues are being taken out of my pay but I didn’t know I was even part of a union?

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What to do if I am a new employee and noticed union dues are being taken out of my pay but I didn’t know I was even part of a union?

I was not supposed to be in the union but somehow wound up in it anyway. I have never been contacted by the union nor have I signed any paperwork regarding a union. Even if I had I would probably have elected not to join the union. The workplace is mixed here, there are union and non-union workers doing basically the same job as myself (clerk typist). I have a copy of the contract and it does state that “if an employee chooses not to become a member of the union, then that employee will be required to pay a representation fee in lieu of dues toto the Union.” I don’t want to be in the union. How do I get out it?

Asked on June 11, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, New Jersey

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The best way to get out of the "union" that you supposedly joined at work that you had no idea that you joined is to consult with your human resources department. If human resources is not a help with respect to your situation, then you need to read the presumed union hand book that is in existence for ways to opt out of the "union".

If that is not helpful, then you need to consult with the "union" representative at the work place as to your desires. If that does not assist, then you need to consult with your local labor department as to your concerns.

Bottom line is that if you do not want to be in the "union" that you have written about, you should not be forced to remain in it.


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