What to do about being made a next of kin in a possible probate scam?

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What to do about being made a next of kin in a possible probate scam?

I am 60 years old male live in the UK. I have been in e-mail correspondence with a 30 year old female “A” from CA. Approximately 3 weeks ago her grandma died leaving an estate of approx $2.5 m. “A” has no living relatives and wants to make me “next-of-kin”. Both she and her lawyer say this is required before probate is granted. I have never met “A” and I do not really wish to legally become “next-of-kin”. I do not wish to inherit her wealth. I am not related to “A”, have never met her. Is the lawyer correct ? Is there any other way to get probate ?

Asked on December 24, 2011 under Estate Planning, California

Answers:

Sharon Siegel / Siegel & Siegel, P.C.

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I hope you are not seriously posting this question.  People can not choose who their next of kin are.  That is based on their life circumstances.  You obiously know something is wrong or you would not title your question possible scam.  Scam - yes.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

From what you have written, you are being set up as part of a scam. People leave their assets upon death to people they know such as friends or relatives and charitable organizations, not complete strangers.

Do not give this person any person information about you such as date of birth, driver's license number and the like. I suggest that you contact California's Attorney General about what contact you have received from this person and send copies of the e mail transmissions. You should also consult with local law enforcement in the United Kingdom about the contact you have been receiving from female "A".


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