How to get my vehicle back after it has been seized?

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How to get my vehicle back after it has been seized?

Last night my friend were at a gentlemen’s club. I was shooting pool and he asked to borrow my keys. About 10 minutes later, patrons entering the establishment said that my friend was under arrest and that the police were searching my car. I immediately went outside to explain that it was my vehicle they were searching. I told them a half a bottle of Hennessy and some chore boy would be found in the car. They took him away and my car. I assume there was something else in my car (maybe a gram of rock cocaine). I didn’t receive any charges.

Asked on September 11, 2010 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Well, never mind the car at this point.  Get an attorney as soon as you can.  If you don't you won't be having to worry about driving as you will be sitting in jail.  You need to discuss under what circumstances your car was searched: what was your friend doing that gave the police probable cause to stop and search him and your vehicle. You need to discuss your admissions at the scene of the seizure.  You need to discuss if the search could be illegal in any way and if that is the case, the charges that may be brought for the "fruits" of the search.  The attorney can also let you know about the laws governing seizure and your rights thereunder.  Good luck. 


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