How should I plead in a “failure to leave information” — leaving the scene of property damage citation?

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How should I plead in a “failure to leave information” — leaving the scene of property damage citation?

I was not drinking or under the influence. I was getting out of work. I backed up and when I pulled forward my tire on my van rubbed against another car’s bumper. I got out and inspected the bumper. I rubbed the mark and it started to come off. I left feeling there was no damage. There was a woman who witnessed the accident and called the police. I have a safe driver status on my licence. My car was insured and the other driver’s damage was paid. I have no prior criminal record. Should I plead no contest and ask for a waive of adjudication?

Asked on April 6, 2009 under Accident Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 13 years ago | Contributor

This is a very hard one to answer.  IF all that is involved is an infraction and a modest fine and perhaps a couple of points on your license, rather than a felony or misdeameanor (either of which may give you a criminal record), if you have a decent record the cost and time and hassle to defend yourself (if a successful defense is likely) is probably not worth it. In that case "pay the $2." 

On the other hand if you'll wind up with a criminal record, or if you already have a record and the conviction on this charge would result in jail time or a huge fine or revocation of your license, get yourself a lawyer and speak to the lawyer now.

www.AttorneyPages.com lists many top Florida crimminal defense lawyers who are best able to advise you and represent you; I am not a FL admitted attorney.

 


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