How long do you have to sue after a car accident?

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How long do you have to sue after a car accident?

Asked on October 30, 2010 under Accident Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

Joyce Sweinberg / Joyce J. Sweinberg

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You have two years from the date of the accident to file a lawsuit. This is known as the Statute of Limitations. If you do not file your lawsuit within that time period, you are then barred from making a claim. You should not wait until then if you have been injured.  The sooner you seek legal counsel, the sooner you can know that someone is watching out for your best interests in this matter.  You should also know that sometimes one can make a claim for UM (uninsured motorist) or UIM (Underinsured Motorist) benefits.  Take a look at this link from my website for more information on these types of coverage...  http://www.jjsassoc.net/Auto_Insurance/UIM_UM.htm   If you have any more questions, do not hesitate to ask me.

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

What you are referring to is known as the Statute of Limitations.  Each state has their own regarding all types of issues: contracts (which include leases), debt collection and personal injury, which includes car accidents.   You are askig about what is known as an injury to a person.  I belive that in Pennsylvania it is a two year statute of limitations.  The two years begins to run (otherwise known as the accrual date) from the date of the accident.  Be careful: sometimes statutes are extended for various reasons but you should use the two years as a barometer for going to see an attorney about your case. It is better to act sooner rather than later.  Good luck.


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