How is the amount of child support determined?

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How is the amount of child support determined?

Asked on April 28, 2011 under Family Law, Indiana

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

 

In IN child support obligations are determined by a set of guidelines. These guidelines consider the weekly adjusted income of both parents, and requires each parent to pay a proportional amount support of the child/children after divorce. Calculation of child support is affected by the parents' income, work-related child care costs, parenting time, healthcare costs, and other factors.

The guideline amount itself is determined on the basis of the combined income of the parents, and states as its objective that the child/children receive the same proportion of the parental income for their support that they would receive if the parents remained together.

However, the guidelines due allow for adjustments based in individual circumstances, such as:

  • Other children - a parent's previous support commitments from a prior relationship can have a significant impact on child support;
  • If the non-custodial parent incurs unusual expenses related to medical conditions, travel for visitation, or business travel;
  • One of the other is not working or is underemployed (without justification);
  • An elderly grandparent depends on one of the parents for support or medical care; or
  • Income is hidden because of tax deductions, payment of personal expenses from a business, or non-taxable employee benefits.

Additionally, the guidelines have special rules for high income parents.  They also provide for a substantial modification when a child goes off to college. 

Here is a site that you may find to be of further help: http://www.in.gov/judiciary/rules/child_support/

 


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