How far can a cop follow you to cite you for a failure to yield?

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How far can a cop follow you to cite you for a failure to yield?

I came off the parkway and then came up to a yield sign. I slowed down. My lane was clear (there are 2 lanes) and I went on my way. About 500 ft up the road. An officer followed me about a mile and half. Then he turned his lights on as I was pulling into a drugstore. I gave him my info. He asked to search my car. I said no. Then he threatened me with calling a dog. I sai,

Asked on May 22, 2018 under General Practice, New Jersey

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There is no hard and fast rule as to how long a police officer can follow someone before pulling them over. It is up to the officer's discretion. Accordingly, they can follow an individual for as long as it takes to make a reasonable determination that they do or do not pose a danger to public safety. Therefore, they can follow a driver who was driving recklessly (and failure to yield would count) for a period of time so as to observe whether or not they commit any other traffic offenses or may be engaged in any type of criminal activity.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There is no hard and fast rule as to how long a police officer can follow someone before pulling them over. It is up to the officer's discretion. Accordingly, they can follow an individual for as long as it takes to make a reasonable determination that they do or do not pose a danger to public safety. Therefore, they can follow a driver who was driving recklessly (and failure to yield would count) for a period of time so as to observe whether or not they commit any other traffic offenses or may be engaged in any type of criminal activity.


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