How do I obtain a refund of tuition fees from a yoga teacher training institute on the grounds that my state of mental well being was compromised?

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How do I obtain a refund of tuition fees from a yoga teacher training institute on the grounds that my state of mental well being was compromised?

I paid to be trained and certified as a yoga teacher and my mental health was compromised by the methods of teaching. The method was called un-learning and the instructor attempted to coerce me into believing that I was a bad person and that I had issues that could only be resolved by admitting that there was something mentally wrong with me, which i refused to do. The training was supposed to last seven days and I left after the third day. Before leaving, I was asked to sign a waiver that stated I left the program on my own and was not entitled to a refund. I refused to sign the waiver.

Asked on June 13, 2012 under Personal Injury, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

There is no claim or recovery for being told you are a bad person and have something wrong with you, so you cannot seek a refund on that ground--the law, simply put, does not make it illegal to do these things.

However, if the program was misrepresented to you--that is, if (whether in person, in marketing materials, etc.) the way the program was described to you before you signed up for it was false or a lie, you may have a claim to rescind the contract based on fraud; if so, that would support a refund. You should therefore consult with an attorney who can evaluate the representations or claims made to you against what you were actually provided, and help you understand if you have a case and how strong it is; you can then decide whether or not to proceed with it.


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