What to do about my employer not paying me the correct pay each week?

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What to do about my employer not paying me the correct pay each week?

We work for gratuity which was suppose to be 13% but when pay came it never was. I went from $1200 a week to $475. When either I or anyone else complained, we were told to quit. After awhile I got checks that were for less and less; if I got a nice check they would tell me it was incorrect and not to cash it. I went to HRand management and asked them to explain how they do payroll neither one could come up with a answer. So I quit now it’s a year later and HR and the boss were fired for fixing the books and keeping all that gratuity from the employees. Who to call or what to do? Should I speak with an employment law attorney? In Philadelphia, PA.

Asked on November 28, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Yes, I would speak with an attorney in the matter as soon as you can.  You did not say what type of business that you were working for.  How did you keep track of the gratuity amounts that you were earning?  That will be key here along with the copies of the paychecks that you were actually paid.  Maybe even the total amount that you thought you had earned versus your tax documents (1099 or W2) that you received from your employer.  I might also call the department of Labor and the State attorney General's Office. I would also contact some of your former co-workers to see what the status of the matter is inside the busness at this point in time. You may get some useful information. Good luck to you. 


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