How do I get a tennant our of a property, I won an eviction, he appeal and that was in Nov 08, we have not gone to court, he has not paid rent

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How do I get a tennant our of a property, I won an eviction, he appeal and that was in Nov 08, we have not gone to court, he has not paid rent

I won the evictionHe appealed No court date and he has not paid rent to the courts’ This has been delyed and the lawyers I have spoken to say I have to wait for him to set a court date.

Asked on May 10, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

See the following: http://www.texashousing.org/tt/rights/eviction/appeal/appeal.html

I also found the following: Is there a faster way to evict someone? There is a remedy that can shorten the time period from 23 days to ten days if you prevail in Court. This is known as a Bond for Immediate Possession and includes a Notice to Defendant of the Bond for Immediate Possession. By filing a bond for immediate possession, the eviction process could be shortened provided the defendant does not request a trial or post a counter bond.

In a Bond for Immediate Possession, you are putting up a bond for surety or cash. If you lose your suit, you could lose all or part of your bond. It must also be noted that any eviction suit judgment may be appealed to the County Courts-At-Law. However, if the defendant requests a trial or files a counter bond, the length of time involved in a Bond For Immediate Possession will be about the same as in a normal Eviction suit,

 

So, best bet, contact the court and see if the timeline for filing an appeal has lapsed.


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