How do I get a disorderly conduct charge dismissed?

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How do I get a disorderly conduct charge dismissed?

I was arrested for disorderly conduct by police. I was having a heated argument with a family member about another person living in the household and I didn’t want it to get out of control so I called 911 and the police showed up. They got my family member’s side of the story and then they got mine. They made the suggestion to leave the house but I told them that I had nowhere else to go. I had exchanged some bad words with police and walked away. I went back into the house and it started to heat up again and so I called 911 once more. The police showed up and arrested me of disorderly. What do I do?

Asked on May 16, 2012 under Criminal Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

Kevin Bessant / Law Office of Kevin Bessant & Associates

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In most cases a disorderly conduct charge is a criminal misdemeanor offense. It is difficult to tell you exactly how to get this case dismissed without knowing all of the complete details of the case (i.e. police report, witness statements, etc), but often times these cases can be dismissed or reduced with the assistance of a criminal defense attorney. Often times, attorney's are able to reach a resolution with the prosecutor and officer who arrested you to either have the charges dismissed or reach an agreement where you plead guilty, but not have the criminal offense on your criminal record. You may want to speak with a criminal defense attorney in your area to see what your options and defenses are based on the facts of your case.


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