How do I ddisputea bill for alleged damages to myformer apartment?

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How do I ddisputea bill for alleged damages to myformer apartment?

Because of a personal situation, I left my apartment 2 weeks before the lease was over. I gave notice of my moving out and because of unemployment. They said they would bill me for what was due and any possible damages. When I received the bill they tried to charge me over $800 to replace the entire carpet. It was in good condition before I left. I did not take pictures because I didn’t think they would try something like this, and because I left, I couldn’t do a walkthrough with them. I didn’t have furniture. I was barely there.

Asked on August 29, 2011 Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In any landlord tenant situation the landlord is required to send the tenant written notice within a certain period of time after the tenant vacates the unit of items needing to be repaired with the return of any unused security deposit not used for repairs with receipts for the repairs.

A tenant is not required to replace items diminished by normal wear and tear such as carpets. Many tenants at the end of the lease try to charge tenants who are vacating the unit with costs of repair for the rugs and carpets when in reality there is no actual damage or abuse to the rugs or carpets. They simply have been worn through normal wear and tear. When tenants pay for alleged carpet "damage" even though the carpet has been worn down through normal use, many landlords simply pocket the money and do not place new carpets or rugs in the vacated unit.

I would write the landlord a letter about the above saying you are not paying for the carpet keeping a copy of it for future reference.

Good luck.

 


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