How do I bring charges against someone who made false aligations about me?

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How do I bring charges against someone who made false aligations about me?

I have been driving a school bus for almost 10 years. A parent sent and email to my supervisor that I had abused and shaken her son’s head. It is such a lie. Her accusations led to me been released from my job. So now my family does not have health insurance and I have lost getting tenured with the school system. I have been very depressed over all of this. I’ve been humiliated in front of my peers. I have never had a right up in all of my years driving. I am a person who goes over and beyond for my students. I am requested from teachers, coaches and parents to drive their children. I just don’t think that she should be allowed to make these false accusations. I have the email that she sent my supervisor.

Asked on May 8, 2019 under Personal Injury, Alabama

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

It's not charges you would bring--it's a lawsuit. When someone makes an untrue factual allegation or claim against you to other people (e.g. your supervisor), which allegation damages your reputation, that is defamation. (The key is, the factual assertion--that you abused or shook her son--must be provably untrue, such as by reliable testimony [yours or other witnesses], medical evidence, etc.). When someone defames you, you can sue them for compensation, such as your loss of income and insurance. Speak to a personal injury attorney to explore this option: the same lawyers who slip-and-fall or car accident cases are generally the ones who handle defamation cases, too.


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