How can we ask to go from a2-year lease to 1-year lease?

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How can we ask to go from a2-year lease to 1-year lease?

We want to do this because we are worried about our jobs. Also, there have been a lot of break-ins in our neighborhood. We have lived here for 4 months.

Asked on September 26, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Ohio

Answers:

L.P., Member, Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Thank you for submitting your question to our site.  Often with a lease, the terms of the actual lease will guide you on what you can and cannot do with regard to terminating the lease.  Financial hardship, such as a fear of losing your job, will more than likely not be a viable reason for terminating your lease at an earlier date.  However, depending on the facility that you rent from, if you go and speak with them and let them know about your situation, they may be willing to let you out of your lease earlier if they have a date certain, so that they can also find a new tenant that they know they can have the rent coming in on time.  While legally they may be able to hold you to the lease, it is often costly for the apartment complex to go to court and seek back rent also while not having a tenant in that apartment collecting current rent.  If they know they will not be able to get rent from you they may be willing to work with your situation, but that is certainly dependent upon the circumstances of the place where you reside.

 

As for the safety of where you reside, typically an apartment complex will not be held responsible for the neighborhood.  They must take certain precautions to ensure safety within common areas of the apartment complex, such as having key pads or certain locks for entry on your building.  However, the apartment complex will not be responsible for the safety of your neighborhood in general.   


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