Does my daughter have a right to get nude pictures/videos removed from the internet if they were taken when she was 16?

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Does my daughter have a right to get nude pictures/videos removed from the internet if they were taken when she was 16?

My daughter made a huge mistake when she was 16 and intoxicated; she got nude on an online webcam public website. She is now 19 and her fiance and her are getting anonymous, harassing messages on Facebook regarding the incident with attachments to the pictures. She is now very depressed and in a downward spiral. Does she have a right or a way to get those pictures removed from the internet because she was underage at the time? If so, is it possible that she’ll get in trouble for distribution even if she was intoxicated and underage?

Asked on December 5, 2011 under Criminal Law, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Good question. If the nude photographs of your daughter which are on the internet depict her as a minor when taken, there is a very good chance that the sites which are potraying the photographs can be forced to remove these photographs on their own in that the photographs could be deemed by law enforcement as "child pornography".

I suggest that the best way to start getting these photographs removed from these internet web sites is to retain a personal injury attorney about the situation where he or she can contact the sites setting forth your daughter's desire to get these photographs removed from the public domain. I would also contact law enforcement as well. It does not matter that your daughter is now an adult. The photos depicting her are when she was a minor.


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