How to avoid a restraining order?

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How to avoid a restraining order?

After a breakup of a romance with a local lady, we agreed to contact each other after a short non-contact period. After a month I texted her, spoke with her by phone, and all seemed well. After a few days I sent a conciliatory e-mail, requesting that we try to be friends. The next day I received a call from an officer, who wrote up a report that she requested that I not make any contact with her. I am afraid though I will see her in town in my travels and fear she would overeact and go for a restraining order which would affect my job. What are my rights? Do I need just to move? I did nothing wrong.

Asked on April 15, 2011 under Criminal Law, Colorado

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Hold on now.  You do not need to uproot your life here.  That is an expensive proposition.  I would, though, go and consult with a criminal attorney i your area to make a call or too on your behalf on the matter.  The officer needs to know that you have no intention of doing anything against the wishes of the young lady and that you were very surprised to get such a phone call since all prior correspondence was mutual and amicable.  And the reason that you have consulted with an attorney is because you now have the feeling that this woman is blowing things out of proportion and you do not wish to be caught in the middle of her made up scenario.  Have the attorney explain that your paths may indeed cross at times and that you have no intention of speaking with her at all.  This way your back is covered.  Good luck.


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