Do I have a case worth pursuing?

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Do I have a case worth pursuing?

I have worked for the same employer for almost 10 years now. My boss has verbally and mentally abused me, thrown things at me, sent his wife to my house where she barged on my front door and started shouting at my girlfriend and I. he also pays new guys more than he pays me, denied my 2 bonuses due to missing work for medical reasons, made me come back to work even though the doctor had not cleared me, amongst plenty of other harassment. I just want to prevent this from happening to anyone else. I am not the only employee he has done this to. I’ve had enough. Is there a case here worth pursuing or do I just need to deal with it and walk away?

Asked on June 11, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Employment in this country is "employment at will." That basically means an employee has no rights to his or her job and can be treated as badly as the employer wants; the assumption is that just as an employer can terminate an unwanted or obnoxious employee, and employee who does not want to put up with the work conditions or harassment can find other employement. So as a general matter, your boss can vebally and mentally abuse you, shout at your girlfriend, pay new employees more, and generally treat you awfully and unfairly.
There are exceptions, however:
1) If you have a written employment contract which is still in force and effect (e.g. not expired), you can enforce its terms in court (with a "breach of contract" lawsuit) if they are helpul to you.
2) An employer may not treat you worse than other employees, or abuse/harass you, on account of certain protected categories or characteristics, principally your race, color, national origin. age 40 or over, sex, religion, or disabiity. If you believe that this abuse is aimed at you for one of these reasons, you may have an employment discrimination claim and should contact either the federal EEOC or your state's civil/equal rights agency.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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