What constitutes solid grounds for termination?

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What constitutes solid grounds for termination?

I was recently fired from my job after 5 years due to “poor customer service”. I feel like I was targeted and discriminated against. I was told by my manager that my voice was abrasive and my demeanor intimidating. For about 6 months I was scrutinized to the point that I was taken off work by my doctor. I was written up and put on a final warning after returning from a medical leave for an incident that occurred 5 days before the medical leave took place. About 2 weeks later I was fired for a complaint that stated I was talking to my co-worker during the transaction. Under the circumstances I was wondering if I have any grounds to fight them for my termination?

Asked on December 2, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You may have grounds for challenging the termination, especially if you are seeking unemployment and seeking to fight any challenges the former employer may make. First things first, you need to get copies of your medical transcripts and see if there is any mention in the notes about such matters (stress from work, perhaps medication your doctor prescribed as a result of the stress suffered at work). I can tell you if your emploiyer wishes to target you or a manager wishes to target you, then you will see a lot of such hidden harassment, It will be up to you and labor counsel to help get you the resolution you deserve. Try consulting with a few labor lawyers and hopefully they can help you sort through this quagmire of harassment and termination.


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