What to do if a debt collector can’t accept my payments because I’m an out of state and the debt is still being reported on my credit report?

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What to do if a debt collector can’t accept my payments because I’m an out of state and the debt is still being reported on my credit report?

About 4 years ago I had a hospital bill but a month after the procedure I moved out of state and became a resident year. The bill went to collections and this is where I am stuck. The collections agency in the original state says they cannot talk to me because I am now a resident of another state and the hospital says they no longer have the bill. It seems the bill is almost completely lost but it still shows up on 1 out of my 3 credit reports. How can I go about fixing this issue?

Asked on March 9, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I see no reason why the third party collection agency cannot speak to you simply because you are residing out of the state where the third party collection agency is located. If you want to find some way to remove the delinquent account from your credit report, I suggest that you contact one of the various companies that attempt to clean up one's credit report to assist you in the matter you are writing about.

Possibly a company that cleans up one's credit report may be able to assist you in the matter you are writing about.


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