Can you fight the narrative portion of a police report?

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Can you fight the narrative portion of a police report?

The police officer stated things that I did not say as well as actions I did not do. I was by myself so I have no witnesses to help me. I am wanting to go to court to fight 2 of my charges and the police statement hinders my case in an extremely unpleasant light. How can I prove its not true?

Asked on June 4, 2009 under Criminal Law, Nevada

Answers:

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

The reality is that the only way you can really get to the point where you are proving the police wrong is to have a trial on the merits of your case.  at a trial, the police report will not be admissible.  Rather, the officer will have to testify about what happened.  he will however, have reviewed the police report and will say what it says.  You will have the opportunity to cross examine him and question his statements and judgments.  A trial may be of interest, but the path of least resistance is the way to go.  you should hire a lawyer to try to work a deal.  Trials that are he said she said cases are usually lost by defendants.  I would hire  a lawyer to make a good deal that does not involve pleading, but rather some community service in exchange for a nolle.  i do not know the charges so i cannot predict what will happen, nor do i know our record - both have a factor.


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