Can tenants who lost their home due to an apartment fire caused by faulty wiring sue their landlord?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can tenants who lost their home due to an apartment fire caused by faulty wiring sue their landlord?

Numerous complaints had been made about electrical issues but nothing was ever done. Multiple people had problem with their lights going out at random, but when the light switch was moved it would come back on. 6 out of 12 apartments were damaged but left 12 families without housing. This was Section 8 housing accomodating mostly elderly individuals. Other problems reported to the landlord, but nothing was done was water heater going out, plumbing issues, and cockroaches. This has caused a lot of distress for these families as there is very limited housing that is Section 8 approved. Some are still without a place to live.

Asked on October 18, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Kentucky

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

It would be worthwhile for the tenants to consult in person with an attorney (especially if the attorney provides a free initial consultation, as many do). A landlord can be held liable for his/her failure to take reasonable steps to correct a known problem and prevent injuries or losses. If electrical problems were reported by multiple persons and/or on multiple occasions to the landlord, that may have been enough to put the landlord on notice that there was a condition which he or she had to examine and possibly correct. If so, the tenants may be able to recover for any losses (e.g of property; the cost of having to stay in a hotel) occasioned by the fire.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption