Can Isue the credit bureau to make them remove2 delinquent accounts that have aleady been proven were opened fradulently in my name?

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Can Isue the credit bureau to make them remove2 delinquent accounts that have aleady been proven were opened fradulently in my name?

I am 21 years old and had 2 accounts opened in my name when I was 14 that I just found out about early last year. After fighting for the whole year to prove they were not mine, the account holder confirmed it. The collection agency told me 3 times that they had reported it to the credit bureau to have the 2 accounts deleted but the credit bureau says they were never contacted. When I faxed letters from the agency stating it should be deleted, the credit bureau listed it as paid instead of deleting and won’t take it off. I just want it off. Can I sue? If not, what can I do? Before graduation I  want it gone.

Asked on January 8, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If the credit reporting bureau has improper information about you being reported that you want removed where the account holder has informed the credit reporting bureau to have it removed, but has not, you have the option of bringing a legal action for an injunctive order to have it removed.

Before you do this, I suggest that you first consult with an attorney who practices law in the area of consumer debt relief. Possibly a written demand letter from an attorney will get the desired relief accomplished as opposed to having to file a lawsuit which can be somewhat expensive and time consuming.


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