Can I sue someone for not paying me, if I was babysitting without a license?

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Can I sue someone for not paying me, if I was babysitting without a license?

I watched a mothers 2 boys ages 2 and 6, with one of my friends whom is also a mother for a week for 40 hours. We agreed 5 an hour for both kids. She refuses to pay us now that pay day is here. She also told us we would be watching them from 9 am-6 pm. She would drop off at 10,11, or 12 pm never 9 am like we were told, and she would never pick up until 7 or 8 pm. She is also accusing us of loosing some of her kids’ clothes she put in the diaper bag, which we know for a fact that every time we changed the 2 year old we put the clothes back in the bag if we even needed the clothes. She tried coming over to my house at 9:30 pm to get these so called clothes and got super mad when I told her I was in bed trying to sleep and not to come over.

I am not licensed but I do have knowledge and experience with childcare; I previously worked at a daycare. I really need the money and if that means I need to spend 25 to submit a claim in small claims for $200, I will do it.

But will I get in trouble since I was not licensed? I have looked all over online and cant even seem to find a straight answer on when I even need a license.

SOMEONE HELP Very overwhelming situation.

Asked on July 27, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Utah

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

There is no license needed to babysit and you will not get in trouble for not having a license. 
You can sue her for the money; there was an agreement between the two of you that she would pay you a certain amount per hour for babysitting. You did your part; therefore, she is contractually obligated to do her part and pay you. You can also include the filing fee (e.g. $25) as part of your claim, so as to recover it, too.


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