Can I sue my mother for stealing my identity and credit?

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Can I sue my mother for stealing my identity and credit?

My mother has a credit card in my name on which she owes $700. I contacted the credit card company and they said they would remove it but it still shows up on my credit. There are also inquires from mortgage loans and other companies too. I just turned 18 last week and I have a credit score of 612, which is ridiculous, because I shouldn’t have any credit. I’ve tried, unsuccessfully, to open some credit cards to build my credit. I am in desperate need of a loan. I’ve been denied everywhere. My mother refuses to pay it. Can I sue her for the money she owes or even more?

Asked on September 30, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you want to sue your mother for using your name to obtain credit (where she has) and you have been damaged by her, then you can.

Before you do so, I caution you about creating family disharmony as well as possible negative backlashes that may come about as a result of the desired legal action against your mother. Potentially the court hearing the action may feel compelled to report your mother to law enforcement for identity theft. If that happens, a criminal investigation and possibly a criminal complaint could result.

I suggest that your mother reach an agreement with you to pay off all credit obligations in your name that she created and promise never to make any future credit card applications in your name.

Good luck.


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