Can I sue a company for leading me on to believe that I will be employed?

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Can I sue a company for leading me on to believe that I will be employed?

I am currently an intern for a corporation and have been for over two years now. When enquired about the status of my employment the general manager responded by telling me “its getting processed now” “its going through the approval process now” “I’m pushing for this month”, “we are close”this has been going on since for 10 months. I am getting fed up and would like to seek legal advice. I feel like I am treated unfairly and taken advantage of. Also, this company prevented me from other options with much better pay than this.

Asked on March 9, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Alaska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Generally, a company is not forced to hire a person, even if they indicated that they probably would, and there is no liability for their failing to hire.

You write that they "prevented" you from taking other options with better pay. IF it was the case that the company knew you had other options--not merely the possibility of looking for a different position, but actual job offers or at least interviews--and knowing that, promised you employment to get you to forego those options and stay with them; you relied on that promise and did give up the other options; and it was reasonable for you to rely on the promise...then if all those criteria are filled, you may be able to enforce the promise. If you think this is the case, you should consult with an employment law attorney to discuss the matter in greater depth and explore your options.


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