CanI resolve an FTA in a state other than the one in which it was issued?

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CanI resolve an FTA in a state other than the one in which it was issued?

In 2004 I received a ticket in FL for “having an alcoholic beverage” in a state forest. Unfortunately I was unable to pay the fine or appear in court. So it resulted in a warrant for failure to appear. I live in another state and have lived here since 2004. I moved here right after receiving the ticket which is why I was unable to be in court. How can I take care of this warrant without returning to FL?

Asked on October 13, 2010 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You just can't "mail it in" as it were.  Your personal appearance will be required. Jailtime can be given in such a case. You will need to appear in CO since that is where the warrant was issued. Since you have not yet been arrested, turning yourself in as opposed to appearing before the judge courtesy of the jail bus will be of help.  Retain an attorney in the area where all of this occurred.  They'll have local contacts with the court and will best be able to negotiate on your behalf.

One thing is for sure, do not ignore this situation. If you are stopped for even something as minor as jaywalking you will be taken into custody.  Even if CO doesn't want to take the time and expense to extradite you for this, you can be arrested again in the future and have to go through the hassle and humiliation each and every time.  Additionally, this will all turn up on most employment background checks.


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