Can I give my tenant my power of attorney to deal with the property manangement company and the home association board while I reside out of state?

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Can I give my tenant my power of attorney to deal with the property manangement company and the home association board while I reside out of state?

I own a town home in CA occupied by my ex-husband; does he have the legal authority, with my POA in that state to deal with the day to day issues that arise with the Property Management Company, the Board of the Homeowners Association, maintenance/vendor workers, including attending board meetings, requesting maintenance, voicing his opinion on issues arising in the complex, etc?

Asked on September 3, 2011 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You can give your tenant a power of attorney to deal with the property management company and the homeowner's association board concerning your parcel that is subject to rules and regulations of a planned unit development board while you are living out of state. If you give such a power of attorney to your tenant, California law requires that your signature on the power be notarized before a notary public

Rather than giving your former a power of attorney concerning voting issues with respect to the association, you might consider giving him a proxy to vote for you concerning matters of importance. It is somewhat like a power of attorney, but is more limited.

 


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