Can I collect unemployment if I was terminated after raising concerns of being hired under false pretenses?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I collect unemployment if I was terminated after raising concerns of being hired under false pretenses?

I was hired with a small company as an Assistant Dispatcher. Once I started the job, I noticed I was being trained for something completely different. I waited for a little over a month and I spoke with the owner the person I interviewed with and got hired by in regards to my duties an responsibilities. He asked me to put my concerns in an email as I did. All of this was Friday. Today, the owner, who works in a different city came in and advised me that after going over my email and my concerns, he had to agree that I was hired under false pretenses and that they couldnt contradict any concerns mentioned in my email and chose to terminate me right then. However, stating that it had nothing to do with my work ethic, professionalism or diligence. However, this has left me without employment and 3 small kids to feed.

Asked on May 6, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

As long as you were not fired for cause, then you are entitled to receive unemployment benefits. In other words, so long as your employment was not terminated due to having broken a company policy, performing your job duties poorly, neglecting responsibilities, missing too much time, lying on the job application or being guilty of theft, etc. That having been said, payment amounts, eligibility requirements and benefit duration times vary from state-to-state.
 

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, you would be eligible for unemployment if you are fired or terminated so long as it was not "for cause"--for violating company policy or not following your manage's directives; for insubordination; for absenteeism; for stealing from the company or using company resources for your own benefit; etc. You still need to meet your state's other requirements to get unemployment, so as hours worked in a given period of time.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption