Can I be compensated for future medical bills for an accident related injury that has not yet been settled yet?

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Can I be compensated for future medical bills for an accident related injury that has not yet been settled yet?

I was rear-ended while at a stoplight and it caused permanent damage to my back; this was just over 2 years ago. I am still under a doctor’s care and they said I will have disability, pain and problems with my back. I work for the State, with sex offenders. I am afraid the state can lay me off indefinitely if the injury worsens. I am 42 years old now and this has not helped to further my career. I need to know that the injury will be paid for in the future if I need therapy of even surgery. Can this be covered by the party that caused the accident or their insurance company?

Asked on July 26, 2012 under Personal Injury, Washington

Answers:

Leigh Anne Timiney / Timiney Law Firm

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

It can be covered, but it is difficult to get an insurance company to pay for medical bills or treatment which may become necessary in the future.  It is often times just too speculative for insurnace companies to want to cover something like a possible surgery or possible future degenerative conditions.  You wold need very specific and definite documentation from you treating doctor that future treatment is highly likely and even with this, you might not get the full amount that it would cost to cover the procedure.  Good luck to you.  


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