Can Human Resources demote me with a transfer?

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Can Human Resources demote me with a transfer?

A co-worker filed a claim with HR that I was creating a hostile work environment with no proof of this claim. When first informed I reached out to HR to explain what was really happening and explained that my issue is with my boss for not being fair and the lack of his communication with me, not my co-worker. I explained that I feel like it is difficult for him to take me seriously because everyone else is 40 or older and I am in my early 30’s. I provided specific examples and emails as proof. Me and my boss had 2 sessions with HR to work out our issue and determine how we would both work to prevent this moving forward. Next, I was advised that I would sit down with my coworker to discuss the issues that we have, even though I said I didn’t have any with her. Well, the meeting ended up getting canceled last week Friday. I was called into my bosses office yesterday and told that if I want to remain in this department that I need to do a complete 180-degree turn and stop saying things about him and the

co-worker, that said I created a hostile work environment, because some of it has gotten back to his wife who works for the same organization in a different department. I was given the option of remaining in my current situation or transferring to another department. If I opt to transfer, will I have say in where I go and can they demote me or alter my pay? Also, I have worked for this company for 5 years.

Asked on April 20, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Unless this possible transfer/demotion/pay reduction violates the terms of a union agreement or employment contract, it is legal. The fact is that a company can set the conditions of work much as it sees fit, including who to demote, transfer or anything else for that matter. That is as long as no form of legally actionable discrimination is a factor (e.g. is based on your race, religion, disability age (over 40), national origin, etc.). 


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