Can a restaurant hold a former employee to a rule made after they quit?

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Can a restaurant hold a former employee to a rule made after they quit?

The local steak house in my small town made a rule the day I quit I did so politely although without a notice that any employee that quits or is fired without notice cannot enter the establishment as a guest for 6 months. Am I accountable to this rule that was made hours after I quit? Is this rule even legal without it being in the handbook and rules signed when employment was granted? I know the simple answer would be eat somewhere else but this is the only decent restaurant within 30 miles.

Asked on June 29, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Kentucky

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Any property owner (or tenant if the property is leased) may ban any person they want from their property, with 1 exception. A place of public accommodation (like a restaurant) cannot ban people fromthe premises due to some form of legally actionable discrimination (i.e. based on their race, religion, gender, disability, age (40 or over) or nationality). Accordingly, you can be banned from the premises of your former employer for any reason or no reason at all.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Any property owner (or tenant if the property is leased) may ban any person they want from their property, with 1 exception. A place of public accommodation (like a restaurant) cannot ban people fromthe premises due to some form of legally actionable discrimination (i.e. based on their race, religion, gender, disability, age (40 or over) or nationality). Accordingly, you can be banned from the premises of your former employer for any reason or no reason at all.


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