can a job fire you for not sign a paper.

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can a job fire you for not sign a paper.

They want me to sign this paper that said they can fire me at anytime without cause and i won’t be able to get any unemployment also . thank you very much

Asked on May 11, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

My first piece of advice is to call a local employment law attorney and ask them about this situation. You are always best off finding out how specifics tend to play out in your given area.

That being said when an employer hires someone it is not a rarity that they want you to sign an employment contract explaining that the job is at will employment. What this means is that the employer can fire you for whatever reason they deem fit without being held liable for a whole slew of possible problems. However at will employment should work both ways and the contract should also protect you if you want to quit for any reason. Make sure both parties are protected by this clause and if they are it is not abnormal contract language.

As for unemployment I do not believe it is illegal to have language such as that in an employment contract. However I personally have seen certain individuals apply for unemployment and still win even with such a contract in place. Unemployment is discretionary and many courts award it even though the employee waived their right. Still I advise you make a quick phone call and double check all of this with a local employment attorney

Good Luck


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