Can a company expect you to pay them if you were misinformed although it was “in the contract”?

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Can a company expect you to pay them if you were misinformed although it was “in the contract”?

Can a gym) expect you to continue to make payments if their worker (who had only been employed a month) misinformed you about how cancellation (only for medical reasons and relocations) works? And that payments would not stop (but only gym time would freeze) if you don’t attend the gym. I have not been to the gym in 8 months, and the payments keep accruing because they (the 3rd party company that collects the payments) keep saying “it was in the contract”. I feel that it is not fair since they have even drafted three payments ($97 total) since I last attended the gym and now they say I owe $250 that includes late charges, past due payments, and the $100 cancellation fee. What should I do?

Asked on June 18, 2012 under General Practice, Louisiana

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country the terms of a written agreement such as the gymn membership that you have written about control over all prior oral representations that you have written about IF the written gymn membership contact was signed after the representations that the employee that you have written about stated which were contrary to what the agreement states.

I suggest that the best way to resolve the gymn membership that you have written about is to have a face to face meeting with its supervisor to see what can be done to rectify the situation you are in without you having to pay money that you did not believe you were required to.

In the future, it is very important to read carefully all agreements and understand them before they are signed.


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