What are my rights regarding harassment by a collection agency?

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What are my rights regarding harassment by a collection agency?

On the same dates they also called my parents house. The first time leaving a message and the second time talking to my mother. The agent told my mother why they were calling that I owed money to XXXX company in the amount of XXXX dollars the date that this all happened on that a complaint has been filed and legal action would be taken if I did not call them back that they felt this was all done with malicious intent and then her contact information. I am an adult isn’t this an invasion of my privacy by telling my boss and my parents this information?? So today I called this company and told them once again to never call my work or my parents house etc. An hour later someone else from the same company called my work asking for me again. Does this violate any laws? This will be the 4th time I’ve told them not to call there. Plus they gave out very personal information to my mother and my boss. What can I or should I do about this?

Asked on November 23, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In every state in this country there are laws prohibiting unfair debt collection practices by third party collection agencies. There is also a federal law prohibiting such unfair practices as well.

As a general rule, examples of unfair business practices consist of, but are not limited to, threatening or intimidating telephone calls, calls to a debtor's employer, relatives and friends, and threatening a lawsuit if the debt is not paid.

I suggest that you consult with an attorney who practices law in the area of unfair debt collection practices to possibly assist you in your current situation.


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