Can a 17 year old minor be charged from a college for classes she dropped out of before the semester even started?

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Can a 17 year old minor be charged from a college for classes she dropped out of before the semester even started?

My daughter was 17 she went to an orientation at WMU . She informed them she would not be attending. They say she owes them $800. They have harassed family and neighbors. She is 20 now and they have put It on her credit report and they will not take it off.

Asked on February 22, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

There is an entire line of contract law that says that a 17 year old, who is a minor, can not enter in to a binding contract.  What did she sign?  Registration papers? Did she formally register and then withdraw from the school?  She needs to read the paperwork that she signed and she needs to think about bringing them to be reviewed.  Someone really needs to read it all.  One letter from an attorney indicating that she was a minor a the time and that she withdrew after orientation and notified the college of same and threatening legal action may do the trick.  In the meantime she should write a letter to each of the reporting agencies stating that he disputes the charge and then the college has 30 days to respond or it is taken off.  Good luck.


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