What canI do if I bought a new car 3 weeks ago but have not yet received any paperwork?

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What canI do if I bought a new car 3 weeks ago but have not yet received any paperwork?

The car was delivered to my home 2 weeks ago. When they delivered the car, they forgot to bring the transaction documents – bill of sale, loan papers, sticker, etc. I called the dealer the next day, and he said that he’d put it in the mail; he did not. Called again a few days later, spoke to another person who said he’d send them out to me, but I have still have not received them. I have called 4 times already. Weeks after purchase, I still have absolutely no documents pertaining to the purchase of this vehicle. Bad service, yes, but is this illegal? What can I do?

Asked on March 13, 2011 under General Practice, New York

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

This is not legal. If you purchased the vehicle waiting for a loan approval (called spot delivery), it appears the dealer could not get you qualified for a loan and is frantically trying to get you one before you return the car and the dealer is forced to return any deposits you gave to them. If you already obtained financing, you should have walked away with not only a purchase and sales agreement, but the retail installment contract detailing your loan and any fees. If you have received neither, not even registration stickers for the vehicle, then you need to immediately file a complaint with two agencies, one with your office of the attorney general in New York and one with the agency who licenses and regulates your dealer in particular (usually a department of financial institutions.


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