How to register a co-owned vehicle if the other co-owner is incapacitated?

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How to register a co-owned vehicle if the other co-owner is incapacitated?

I am on an auto loan and vehicle registration with a co-borrower. He used to be my significant other. I have relocated from the state in which the car was registered. Both my former and current states of residence are telling me that I need his signature for power of attorney to get the application for title and registration. He is now hospitalized; if he pulls out of his condition his family is being told he will have to be put in a nursing home or some type of rehabilitation facility. What options do I have?

Asked on February 7, 2012 under Business Law, Tennessee

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Talk to the department of motor vehicles in the state in which you currently reside and see if there is an option for power of attorney to sign on his behalf (I am sure you will have to provide a notarized or official copy of the power of attorney). If he is currently incapicitated and unable to care for himself, can you talk to his family and find out who is handling his affairs at the moment. If you can, see if that person can help you get the car signed over so you can be on your way. Otherwise, you may have to go through some administrative agency complaint process or go in front of a hearing officer or even court to get this matter squared away for you.


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