Are we entitled to any help from the seller due to a non-repairable swimming pool?

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Are we entitled to any help from the seller due to a non-repairable swimming pool?

We recently purchased a home (December 2008). The home has an in-ground pool in the backyard. The pool was listed on the sellers disclosure, but not the condition of the pool. When we went to get it opened, we found that due to years of neglect, the liner was ruined and would cost too much to be replaced. Now we are looking at having it filled in. Are we entitled to anything back from the seller, because the swimming pool was part of the homes value when it was purchased? Are we able to get any help from the seller to have it filled in?

Asked on June 23, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

This is a borderline case, and both the detailed facts and quite possibly some of the finer points of Pennsylvania real estate law might be very important.  I don't practice in your state, and there are differences.  For advice you can rely on, you need to have an attorney in your area review all of the facts.  One place to find a lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com

In some cases, the buyer can't do anything because they had an opportunity to inspect the property, and bought it as they found it.  Of course, it's hard to really inspect a swimming pool if it's covered over for the off-season.


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