AmI liable for ambulance and hospital bills ifI was forced to accept treatment?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

AmI liable for ambulance and hospital bills ifI was forced to accept treatment?

I passed out at work and told them that i refused to call for an ambulance. However, they did anyway and I was made to go to the hospital. After all was said and done, they told me its not workmans comp. But why should I have to pay the bills when they made me go after I refused?

Asked on September 2, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If you refused to the ambulence crew when they showed  up, you would have  a good defense to having to pay the bill. Similarly, if once you were taken to the hospital, you simply walked out and refused treatment, you'd have a good case. But regardless of your original refusal, if you got into the ambulence and let the hospital examine you, you accepted the treatment and had to pay. And if you did that because your employer insisted you go and you went along with it rather than disobey and possibly be fired--which would be within your employer's right, since worrying about liability from an employee collapsing at work is legitimate--then that was your choice; you could have simply walked away, including, if necessary, from your job.

The above is admittedly harsh, but harsh doesn't change the fact that if, for whatever reason, you used ambulence and hospital services, you need to pay for them. If  you have health insurance, check to see if  it will pick up some or all of the cost.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption