How to end a business relationship for graphic design work?

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How to end a business relationship for graphic design work?

I was doing some graphics work for a client of mine that became very unprofessional and began to make racial remarks amongst other types of slander. I broke off the business relationship and informed him in an e-mail that I had come to the conclusion that I did not want to do work for him anymore. He then replied stating that I had to return all source files and destroy/delete all Intellectual Property. I sent links to all of his source files and confirmation that I had deleted all files that I had. He then responded with a threat that I needed to send a written statement with my signature.

Asked on September 12, 2010 under Business Law, California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

First, do you have a written contract?  If yes, does it speak to the terms of termination?  Then abide by it for your own good.  If you do not then you have an oral contract.  Were the terms regarding termination ever discussed or memorialized in an e-mail?  Then abide by them. Listen, I understand that in this day and age of technology everyone wants to do everything by sitting at their computer but really here it so would be best for you to sit down and type out a letter indicating what the terms of the termination discussed between you and that you have complied and that you sent follow up e-mails (copes enclosed) with the links and that as far as you are concerned it is over.  Send it by certified mail.  It really is best.  Good luck.


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