What to do if a subcontractor is thtreatening to use a lien treat to make me pay him in full for faulty work?

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What to do if a subcontractor is thtreatening to use a lien treat to make me pay him in full for faulty work?

I have $400 in back charges against a $1900 invoice. I’ve offered to pay him 1500.00 today but he refuses to accept it and is threatening to lien the owners property. This is all within 48 hours of receiving the invoice in the mail. I told him I wanted to have the work inspected and would consider paying the whole bill but it would take a couple for weeks but that’s not good enough, he wants all of it, right now. Am I sitting on my hands waiting for him to make a move or is there something I can do to insulate the owner from this debacle

Asked on November 16, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you are the general contractor facing a threatening subcontractor who might lien your client's home but you are concerned about faulty workmanship by him or her, you should offer to place the check requested in an escrow account pending a successful inspection of the work by a permit and building inspector for the work of improvement.

I would also consult with your state's contractor's licensing board for suggestions as well. You do not want to pay for work that it not acceptable by the permit and resources department overseeing the project. Does your subcontract require payment upon permit approval?


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